Category Archives: – reading

What I’m reading and recommend.

American Progressivism

This collection of writings by prominent politicians, authors, and activists of the Progressive Era explores Progressivism’s role in the development of American political thought. Pestritto and Atto provide insight into each figure’s influence on Progressive Era American politics by introducing each entry with the context within which the author of a given selection is writing.
[amazonify]0739123041:right[/amazonify]
I believe this and Mark Levins “Liberty and Tyranny” are two of the most important books you can read to “really” understand what is happening with our American Government

The Forgotten Man

The Forgotten Man: A New History of the Great Depression (Paperback)
by Amity Shlaes (Author)

Its duration and depth made the Depression “Great,” and Shlaes, a prominent conservative economics journalist, considers why a decade of government intervention ameliorated but never tamed it. With vitality uncommon for an economics history, Shlaes chronicles the projects of Herbert Hoover and Franklin Roosevelt as well as these projects’ effect on those who paid for them. Reminding readers that the reputedly do-nothing Hoover pulled hard on the fiscal levers (raising tariffs, increasing government spending), Shlaes nevertheless emphasizes that his enthusiasm for intervention paled against the ebullient FDR’s glee in experimentation. She focuses closely on the influence of his fabled Brain Trust, her narrative shifting among Raymond Moley, Rexford Tugwell, and other prominent New Dealers. Businesses that litigated their resistance to New Deal regulations attract Shlaes’ attention, as do individuals who coped with the despair of the 1930s through self-help, such as Alcoholics Anonymous cofounder Bill Wilson. The book culminates in the rise of Wendell Willkie, and Shlaes’ accent on personalities is an appealing avenue into her skeptical critique of the New Deal.
[amazonify]0060936428:right[/amazonify]

Enhanced by Zemanta